Inhofe, Reed tells FCC to stay and reconsider ligado order | Panda Anku

A bipartisan group of eight US senators has sent a letter to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) urging the agency to stay and reconsider Ligado Networks’ order.

U.S. Senators Jim Inhofe (R-Okla.) and Senior Member and Senate Armed Services Committee Chair Jack Reed (DR.I.) led the group by sending the letter to FCC Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel and she asked to reconsider granting Ligado License Amendment Request.

Ligado wants to use part of the communications spectrum in a way that risks interfering with GPS reception, a move that has been criticized by many industry insiders as well as other government agencies, including the defense and transport ministries.

The timing of writing is crucial as Ligado has announced its intention to roll out a terrestrial network as early as September 30th. The National Academy of Sciences plans to release a report on the FCC’s order on September 9.

Immediate Risks

Inhofe and Reed were joined by Sens. Tammy Duckworth (D-Ill.), Mazie Hirono (D-Hawaii), Mark Kelly (D-Ariz.), Mike Rounds (RS.D.), Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz. ) and Dan Sullivan (R-Alaska).

The senators write, “The repeal and review of the Ligado ordinance is necessary to address the immediate risks associated with Ligado’s intent to begin operations in the 1526-1536 MHz band on or after September 30, 2022.” We remain deeply concerned that the Ligado regulation does not adequately protect the operation of adjacent bands – including those related to GPS and satellite communications – from harmful interference that affects myriad military and commercial activities.

“We urge you to repeal the Ligado ordinance and to give due consideration to widespread concerns within the executive branch, Congress and the private sector regarding the anticipated impact of the Ligado ordinance on national security and other systems,” the senators continued .

A copy of the letter can be found here and below.

Dear Chair Rosenworcel,

We are writing to urge the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to stay and reconsider the FCC’s order granting requests from Ligado Networks LLC (Ligado) to establish a terrestrial wireless network in the vicinity of the L-band Satellite Spectrum, FCC 20-48, adopted April 19, 2020 (the Ligado Order). We remain extremely concerned that terrestrial L-band operations would pose an unacceptable risk to Department of Defense (DOD), federal government Global Positioning System (GPS) and satellite communications (SATCOM) operations.

Prior to the enactment of the Ligado Ordinance, fourteen federal agencies and departments expressed strong opposition to Ligado’s motions over concerns about potential harmful interference to GPS operations. In May 2020, shortly after the Ligado order was issued, the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), on behalf of the Executive Branch, petitioned the FCC to reconsider its decision. That filing asked the FCC to “revoke its approval of the mobile satellite service (MSS) license amendment requests” granted to Ligado, which the NTIA alleged are causing “irreparable harm” to federal government GPS users. would.

Suspending and reconsidering the Ligado regulation is necessary to address the immediate risks associated with Ligado’s intention to “commence operations in the 1526-1536 MHz band on or after September 30, 2022”. We remain deeply concerned that the Ligado regulation does not adequately protect the operation of adjacent frequency bands – including those related to GPS and satellite communications – from harmful interference that affects myriad military and commercial activities. We urge you to repeal the Ligado Ordinance and to give due consideration to widespread concerns within the Executive Branch, Congress and the private sector regarding the expected impact of the Ligado Ordinance on national security and other systems.

We look forward to continuing to work with you to ensure federal spectrum policy adequately protects the millions of military and commercial users who rely on L-band satellite services every day.

Featured Photo: Brian Kinney/Shutterstock.com

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